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Posted on Nov 9, 2016 in Abuse, Browse by Name | 0 comments

Lagoon Amusement Park Utah

Lagoon Amusement Park Utah

Lagoon Amusement Park in Farmington, Utah has been intensely criticized for decades because of its dismal “Wild Kingdom Train” ride. The attraction, which Lagoon promotes as the “second-largest zoo in Utah”, features a miniature steam locomotive that runs past a collection of over 60 live exotic animals, including lions, tigers, cougars, leopards, and bears.

lagoon-park-abuse-lionsLittle has changed about the ride since 1967, when it was first installed. Big cats are housed in barren, concrete-floored cages with no natural vegetation and very little stimulation or enrichment. These enclosures do not meet the bare minimum standards of accreditation by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). No educational information is provided other than small signs outside each cage displaying the name of each species. Children on the train frequently roar, scream, or throw things at the animals, and there are rumors of deliberate animal abuse by park employees. In one of these alleged incidents, a disgruntled train conductor deliberately blew hot steam into the face of a brown bear named Tippy, resulting in second degree facial burns.

Like many unregulated private zoos, Lagoon’s menagerie is inconsistent. Animals are both bred on-site and bought, sold, and traded with other private zoos and breeders (Lagoon claims that this is “rescuing animals”). This means that the origins and ultimate destination of the animals at Lagoon are unknown and untraceable. In the past, Lagoon has been cited by the USDA for disposing of unwanted animals by selling them to slaughter and for failing to maintain acquisition/disposition records.

Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune Riders view Siberian Tigers on the Wild Kingdom Train ride at Lagoon Amusement Park, Saturday, June 2 2012 in Layton. Protesters lined Lagoon Drive in Layton to protest Lagoon's treatment of animals in the park as seen from the Wild Kingdom Train ride that circles a zoo where big cats, zebras, and other animals are confined to small enclosures.

Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune
Riders view Siberian Tigers on the Wild Kingdom Train ride at Lagoon Amusement Park, Saturday, June 2 2012 in Layton. Protesters lined Lagoon Drive in Layton to protest Lagoon’s treatment of animals in the park as seen from the Wild Kingdom Train ride that circles a zoo where big cats, zebras, and other animals are confined to small enclosures.

Many visitors to Lagoon are unaware that the park houses live animals because much of the zoo is only visible from on board the train. Those who choose to visit the attraction are becoming increasingly upset about the outdated, prison-like environment that the animals are forced to live in, and there have been many petitions and protests attempting to convince the park to retire its animals to sanctuaries. The editorial board of the Standard-Examiner, Utah’s 3rd-largest newspaper, urged shutting down the zoo in a 2016 editorial, writing: “This is not 1967. We know better now — or at least we should.” The park continues to ignore these complaints by claiming that their zoo is “accredited” by the state and federal government; that “whether cages are too small is a subjective opinion;” and that their enclosures exceed USDA regulations. This is nothing to brag about, as the USDA only requires that enclosures provide enough space for the animal to stand up and turn around in.

The USDA has repeatedly cited Lagoon for failure to comply with the federal Animal Welfare Act. Recurrent problems found by inspectors included filthy enclosures, inadequately trained employees, failure to provide sick and dying animals with veterinary care, and repeat animal deaths. A summary of these citations is as follows:

August 18, 2013: An animal keeper was hospitalized in serious condition after being gored in the leg by a wildebeest. Lagoon claimed to have “no information” regarding the incident.  http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=26536598

July 10, 2012: According to the (Ogden, Utah) Standard-Examiner, the USDA cited Lagoon for having water bowls inside an elk pen that were encrusted with dirt and algae.

September 27, 2011: The USDA cited Lagoon for failure to provide two leopards with adequate veterinary care. In contradiction to its parasite-control program, the facility failed to retest the cats for parasitic infection after they tested positive for parasitic nematode worms and were given treatment.

September 27, 2006: The USDA cited Lagoon for failure to provide kangaroos with adequate veterinary care. The inspector wrote that “information on the health problem which led to the euthanasia of the adult female kangaroo on 7-22-06 has still not been conveyed to the kangaroo’s attending veterinarian.” The investigator added that such information was necessary to “ensure that the remaining kangaroos receive adequate care including any possible measures to prevent a reoccurrence.”

May 4, 2004: The USDA cited Lagoon for not correcting a previously identified violation for failure to provide adequate veterinary care. The inspector determined that animal “[h]ealth problems are not being detected, diagnosed and treated” and cited several examples. Both of a peccary’s eyes were “encrusted with amber colored material.” At various times, a camel was observed to have a lump on his face and an abscess and a lump on his lip, and there was no evidence that he had received treatment. Numerous animals were in need of hoof trimming, including a fallow deer whose hooves were “at least 4 inches long” and a peccary who had “overgrown front claws bilaterally that turned up on the tips.” A cougar, a camel, a fallow deer, and a peccary were observed limping. The inspector also wrote that health records were missing vital information. For example, there was no record of the dosage of a medication for an unidentified animal. Lagoon was also cited for failure to maintain facilities—the fencing for 12 bison was noted to contain protruding wires near ground level, one of which was approximately 10 inches long and formed a loop. The inspector expressed concern that the bison could “get a leg caught in loops of wire and potentially break a leg or injure themselves.” Lagoon was also cited for failure to provide a sufficient number of adequately trained employees.

The inspector wrote, “It is evident that the facility lacks employees and a supervisor who are adequately trained to maintain the professionally acceptable level of husbandry practices.” The inspector also wrote that despite being told by two USDA veterinarians that several animals’ hooves needed immediate attention, the supervisor didn’t agree that hoof care was needed. The inspector observed, “It appears that the facility does not understand the importance of proper hoof care in preventing lameness.” The inspector also noted, “The facility needs to evaluate whether they have appropriate facilities to provide safe handling conditions for the fallow deer when they provide the needed hoof trimming. … There have been anesthetic deaths and injuries (a fractured tibia and a ruptured tendon) from darting in the past when the fallow deer were worked without appropriate facilities.”

March 19, 2004: The USDA cited Lagoon for not correcting a previously identified violation for failure to provide adequate veterinary care. The zoo couldn’t produce documentation that the attending veterinarian had visited the site every two weeks, as prescribed by the program of veterinary care. It also couldn’t provide documentation of applicable and complete deworming treatments for hoofstock. Lagoon was also cited for failure to provide adequate drainage in a muntjac deer enclosure. It was observed to be covered in “muck ranging from 2 to 5 inches deep which exudes a strong excreta odor,” and the animals were forced to stand in the muck in order to reach the feeder in the enclosure. The inspector also wrote that Lagoon failed to provide 10 bison with water. The inspector also noted that the somewhat overgrown front toe of a fallow deer had been pointed out to a facility representative.

October 4, 2002: A USDA inspector noted that the evaluation of the deaths of a young zebra, a muntjac deer, and three Corsican sheep who died in late 2001 had not yet been completed and that two elk, four Corsican sheep, and one fallow deer would need more shelter space in the next two to three weeks.

July 6, 2001: In a letter to Lagoon, the USDA warned the facility that keepers must carefully observe newborns to ensure that they nurse. Lagoon was encouraged to develop a more effective husbandry program for neonatal animals following the deaths of a newborn elk calf and a fallow deer fawn.

April 19, 2001: The USDA cited Lagoon for not correcting a previously identified violation for failure to maintain records of acquisition and disposition. There were no disposition records for 11 fallow deer who were no longer at Lagoon and two buffalo who were sold to an individual for slaughter, as well as other animal transactions. The USDA also cited Lagoon for failure to provide elk with shelter from direct sunlight and inclement weather.

August 28, 2000: The USDA cited Lagoon for failure to maintain records of acquisition and disposition for animals who died or were born during the year.

July 20, 2000: The USDA cited Lagoon for failure to provide adequate veterinary care. A buffalo cow underwent surgery on May 2, 2000, to remove a rubber band which had been embedded around a toe. The animal didn’t receive sufficient follow-up care and developed an infection which resulted in the animal being euthanized. The inspector also found outdated medication and dirty needles used for injections. Lagoon was also cited for improper animal handling. The public had access to animals without the presence of a trained employee. The inspector also noted that necropsy reports for a fallow deer who had died and a stillborn elk were not available.

March 30, 2000: The USDA cited Lagoon for failure to comply with its veterinary-care program—a peccary hadn’t received testing or treatment for parasites. Lagoon was also cited for failure to provide complete information for two recently purchased camels. The inspector noted that a camel died on March 5, 2000, from peritonitis associated with a perforated ulcer and that the facility hadn’t provided its employees with outside training.

September 16, 1999: The USDA cited Lagoon for failure to provide the inspector with documentation addressing the problem of inadequately trained employees.

August 2, 1999: The USDA cited Lagoon for not correcting previously identified violations for failure to provide adequate veterinary care and employing inadequately trained staff. A camel exhibiting sweatiness and labored breathing was down for 12 hours and never received veterinary care. The animal died of peritonitis subsequent to a perforation in the digestive tract. The inspector also wrote that several elk remained thin, with protruding ribs. Nutritional supplements prescribed by the veterinarian weren’t being fed to the animals.

June 29 and 30, 1999: The USDA cited Lagoon for not correcting previously identified violations for failure to provide adequate veterinary care, for filthy enclosures, and for inadequately trained employees. A newborn fallow deer was never observed nursing and died 37 to 38 hours after birth. Several elk remained thin, with protruding ribs and hair loss. There was no record of deworming, routine tests for intestinal parasites, or vaccinations for the elk. The sheep enclosure had a high concentration of feces. The inspector directed Lagoon to conduct necropsies on any subsequent deaths to “facilitate herd health management and to assure adequate veterinary care.”

May 12, 1999: The USDA cited Lagoon for not correcting a previously identified violation for failure to provide adequate veterinary care. The male lion, Rhondo, died on April 18, 1999. A necropsy found complete bowel blockage. He had suffered from vomiting, weakness, shallow breathing, sticky feces, nasal discharge, a dry and matted coat, and thick, dry lips. He also couldn’t swallow medications. Employees failed to recognize the severity of his condition or accurately communicate his symptoms to the veterinarian.

April 8, 1999: The male lion identified as needing veterinary care during an April 2, 1999, inspection was suffering from anemia, arthritis, and abnormal kidney function. Lagoon was cited for repeatedly failing to develop a veterinary-care plan to address deficient capture and anesthesia procedures and the poor health of elk.

April 2, 1999: The USDA cited Lagoon for not correcting previously identified violations for improper feeding, filthy enclosures, and failure to provide adequate veterinary care. Lagoon failed to develop a veterinary-care plan to address deficient capture and anesthesia procedures and the poor health of elk. Lagoon was cited for failure to provide a lion with veterinary care. The inspector wrote that Rhondo “was thin to the point that the ribs and hip bones were prominent. He was weak and had difficulty walking or even standing. … He was observed retching for a period of time and then vomited at least a cup of yellow-green fluid .… His tongue appeared pale …. There were no [records] … indicating that the animal’s deteriorating condition has been noticed.” The inspector also noted that dead-animal disposal must comply with all applicable regulations.

February 8, 1999: The USDA cited Lagoon for failure to provide adequate veterinary care after four fallow deer died because of anesthetics or poor darting techniques employed during tranquilizer use. The facility also had outdated medication, and seven elk in “a very small pen” appeared thin and had rough hair coats. The inspector recommended routine necropsies because of a high death rate and unexplained deaths. Lagoon was also cited for feeding moldy hay, which can contain toxins, to camels, sheep, and deer and placing a mineral block on the ground where there was fecal contamination. Lagoon was again cited for failure to provide seven elk with sufficient space. A zebra and her 7-month-old baby as well as 16 Corsican sheep also weren’t provided with adequate space. Lagoon was cited a sixth time for filthy enclosures. The inspector wrote, “Excessively soiled bedding has been a chronic problem at this facility.”

October 16, 1997: The USDA cited Lagoon for inadequate drainage that caused elk to “stand in the muck” while eating, enclosures that were filthy with an excessive accumulation of waste, and failure to record the death of a cougar in its disposition records.

Other incidents not recorded by the USDA include:

In 2002, a young elk died from a strangulated hernia five days after being gored by a large bull elk that was in the same pen. Before the incident, visitors had warned park staff that the bull was acting aggressively, but no action was taken to separate the animals.  http://www.heraldextra.com/news/local/elk-death-at-lagoon-s-zoo-prompts-criticism/article_9df51128-fb14-575e-9166-7ecb01c23ba3.html

In August 1996, a 16-year-old girl who was working as a ticket-taker at the train ride was bitten by a cougar named Kumba after she stuck her arm inside the cage to pet him. The cougar clamped his jaws down on her forearm until a park security officer arrived and sprayed the cat with pepper spray. Per Utah state law, Kumba was later euthanized to test for rabies. No changes were made to the park’s caging and the employee was not fired as a result of the incident.  http://www.deseretnews.com/article/506235/COUGAR-THAT-BIT-WORKER-AT-LAGOON-IS-EUTHANIZED.html
Here’s some media and articles that might be useful to archive on the site.

Lagoon Park Videos:

A video of the ride.

A good video made by an activist in 2012 that sums up concerns about the zoo.

Articles:

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah Protestors Want Lagoon to Close Animal Exhibits:  http://archive.sltrib.com/story.php?ref=/sltrib/home3/54230919-200/lagoon-park-animal-andrew.html

Standard Examiner: It’s time for Lagoon to stop caging wild animals:  http://www.standard.net/Our-View/2016/05/08/lagoon-cages-lions-tigers-amusementpark-wildlife-editorial

Utah teens upset with treatment of animals at Lagoon start petition:  https://www.ksl.com/?sid=40861354&nid=148

Lagoon denies complaints of animal abuse:  http://davisclipper.com/bookmark/23158806-Lagoon-denies-complaints-of-animal-abuse

Deseret News: Group protests at Lagoon:  http://www.deseretnews.com/article/771926/Group-protests-at-Lagoon.html

Lagoon gets plea to give wild animals more space:  http://www.deseretnews.com/article/944551/Lagoon-gets-plea-to-give-wild-animals-more-space.html

USDA files regarding Lagoon

lagoon-park-abuse-1997-971016lagoon-park-abuse-lions-2

lagoon-park-abuse-1999-990208

lagoon-park-abuse-1999-990402

lagoon-park-abuse-1999-990408

lagoon-park-abuse-1999-990512

lagoon-park-abuse-1999-990802

lagoon-park-abuse-1999-990916

lagoon-park-abuse-2000-000330

lagoon-park-abuse-2000-000720

lagoon-park-abuse-2000-000828

lagoon-park-abuse-2001-010419

lagoon-park-abuse-2001-010706

lagoon-park-abuse-2002-020703

lagoon-park-abuse-corporation-pdf

Photos of Conditions at Lagoon Park

lagoon-park-abuse-lion-enclosure lagoon-park-abuse-lion-cage lagoon-park-abuse-lioness   lagoon-park-abuse-sad-lion lagoon-park-abuse-sad-tiger lagoon-park-abuse-tiger lagoon-park-abuse-tiger2

Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune A Siberian Tiger as seen from the Wild Kingdom Train ride at Lagoon Amusement Park, Saturday, June 2 2012 in Layton. Protesters lined Lagoon Drive in Layton to protest Lagoon's treatment of animals in the park as seen from the Wild Kingdom Train ride that circles a zoo where big cats, zebras, and other animals are confined to small enclosures.

Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune
A Siberian Tiger as seen from the Wild Kingdom Train ride at Lagoon Amusement Park, Saturday, June 2 2012 in Layton. Protesters lined Lagoon Drive in Layton to protest Lagoon’s treatment of animals in the park as seen from the Wild Kingdom Train ride that circles a zoo where big cats, zebras, and other animals are confined to small enclosures.

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Posted on Jul 23, 2012 in Abuse, News Feed | 0 comments

Pakistan Zoos are No Place for Animals

Animals have a pretty rotten deal in Pakistan since the nation, by and large, can’t seem to stand the sight of the four-legged ones. Dogs are the worst off because man’s best friends from times immemorial are “paleed,” or untouchable. Watch the zealous ones in evasive action should, heaven forbid, a dog arrive. Short of an epileptic fit and frothing at the mouth, they will recoil in the same terror as women do when faced with a formidable mouse.

 

Our zoos-I find them more akin to slaughterhouses – are in horrific condition. The last priority of all administrators is the welfare of the inmates, because they have little or no use for these beautiful creations of God. As and when such good people as the famed Dr Toosi came upon the Lahore Zoo and the animals at long last had a real friend, circumstances were created that eventually forced that good and capable man to retreat both from the zoo and the country. The rest are third-class baboos with minds narrower than a needle and they like to keep their distance from those who have the misfortune of falling into their rotten corruption- and incompetence-ridden world. Zoos are a big no no and should be dispensed with. They have been around but the idea of imprisoning animals who are born to roam at will into a 10 foot by 10 foot cage is a criminal offence in my book – but zoos don’t read my ‘book,’ and so the animals suffer till they die often from diseases that are wholly preventable.

 

A so-called Safari Park has been built outside Lahore, but barring a few saving graces it is a forlorn, desolate and dusty land with the animals confined to an existence with few privileges. I think it will soon die a natural death, but by the time it does, the animals who reside here would have long died. I saw the place from close quarters and the sight of mangy big cats lying listlessly, completely bored and broken in spirit, was enough. I fled from this latest aberration and haven’t been back, but if it has improved I’ll walk barefoot to pay my respects to the Baboo-Kingdom.

 

They tell me that Karachi Zoo is even worse. It is no place for anyone, least of all an animal who cannot protest or put a shotgun to some official’s head and press the trigger. Now another scam, much in the same vein as was witnessed in Lahore some years ago. The Karachi Municipal Corporation, KMC, has taken upon itself to import four of the large cats-two magnificent Bengal tigers and two-what the officials blithely claim are “White Lions.” This scam was earlier pulled off in Lahore amidst much fanfare-but the White Lions are actually albinos, most likely the result of too much inbreeding. The KMC has considered it a waste of time to obtain an NOC from the Islamabad-based National Council for Conservation of Wildlife. (Do they mean by wildlife the ministers and the high-level generals, a species that is proliferating day and night?)

 

When the animals arrived after a gruelling two day travel-the Bengal tigers from Belgium and the albinos from South Africa – the KMC officials had done no paperwork in the case of the Bengal tigers, so they suffered for hours in their cages. The two pairs have set back the KMC by Rs17 million. As one correspondent said, at Rs5 a pop, it should take us into the next century to recover this amazing “investment.” Perhaps the KMC could have spent this money (aren’t they broke?) on improving sewerage, but then what good would that do? For one thing, the KMC administrator, the moving spirit behind (and I daresay in front of) this lark, wouldn’t be able to inaugurate the sewerage, whereas he has a whole song and dance routine planned for the big Inaugural, the Lord be praised.

 

The icing on this stinking cake is there is no NOC and no permission so far from the Sindh Wildlife Department. While those will be undoubtedly squeezed out, the KMC has simply gone ahead and done what it wanted to do – hang the rules. How this import was allowed without an NOC is not a mystery, as we all know. Worse is that the “importers” (read crooks who have been given the walloping contract) are defaulters already and are facing trial for a scam. The company masquerades under various identities and brought in lions, tigers, hippos, and what have you, in 2007. Case remains pending! Now this. Ye gods, is there no mercy? However palms will be greased and the gravy train will chug along happily.

 

I am not an expert on wildlife trade, but I believe that Pakistan is a signatory to CITES-the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. The Bengal tigers who are cut down to a little over 2,000 cannot be traded unless it is established that they are for breeding purposes and are assured of first-class conditions. The zoos at Karachi and Lahore-Islamabad too – are killing fields. What chance does an animal have? Breeding? They will be fighting to stay alive. The big cats in Lahore are herded into their suffocating cages by – guess what? Long bamboo poles with cloth doused in kerosene and a “trained” fire expert thrusting the pole at the terrified cats which scamper into their cages! Modern animal management.

 

The Lahore Zoo, which is rolling with money. has spent next to nothing on the animals. There are no X-ray facilities, no pharmacy, no vaccination program (TB is rampant), no medical record, qualified doctors or vets, no infirmary, operating arrangements and necessary qualified staff. God forbid, should an animal contract a disease, it would be dead sooner than later. The list of innocent ones sent to an early grave is a long and shameful one, and the blood of those innocents is on the heads of the heads at the zoos we have. The only “animal handlers” in Lahore are the security guards. You know why? Because they spend time with the animals, talk to them and give them treats. When the animals see the zoo director flanked by his scraping, bowing minions, they recoil in horror and retreat to the farthest corner. They know who their enemies are.

 

People like me have written reams without an iota of action. A group of us even begged the current chief minister to intervene, make the zoo autonomous and take it out of the clutches of the vile people, but many promises of executive action yielded zero results. Instead, his tacit approval led to two snow leopards ending up in cages in Lalazar, Nathiagali, where they live out their lives. More big cats have been added. Who looks after them? Your guess is as good as mine.

 

So my dear animal friends freshly arrived in Karachi, be prepared for a fate worse than death. Sorry, but you are now officially in the land of the devils.

 

The writer is a Lahore-based columnist. Email: masoodhasan66@gmail.com

 

http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-9-122120-Over-the-Top-Bad-news-for-big-cats

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